March 5, 2012

Dr. Weston A. Price

I have always found it interesting that most of our studies on health and nutrition have been focused on observing sick people to figure out how to get healthy. Finding irregularities in their physical make up and blaming it on a genetic flaw, like being predisposed to high cholesterol no matter how well you take care of yourself. The obvious answer is that this person needs to be put on Lipitor or some other statin for the rest of their life. It does not make sense to me how the human race ever evolved without medication to counter our genetic flaws. I believe the real problem with our observations of health is that our focus of study is in the completely wrong place. Our base of logic is off. Studying sick people to figure out how to be healthy is kind of like learning how to drive by going down to the DMV and asking to be instructed by the person with the worst driving record.

In the mid 1920’s and 30’s a Dr. and Clinical nutritionist named Weston A. Price had an ingenious idea, he was going to study healthy people to figure out how to be healthy! Price travelled the world over in order to study isolated human groups, including sequestered villages in Switzerland, Gaelic communities in the Outer Hebrides, Eskimos and Indians of North America, Melanesian and Polynesian South Sea Islanders, African tribes, Australian Aborigines, New Zealand Maori and the Indians of South America. Wherever he went, Dr. Price found that beautiful straight teeth, freedom from decay, stalwart bodies, resistance to disease and fine characters were typical of primitives on their traditional diets, rich in essential food factors.

When Dr. Price analyzed the foods used by isolated primitive peoples he found that they provided at least four times the calcium and other minerals, and at least TEN times the fat-soluble vitamins from animal foods such as butter, fish eggs, shellfish and organ meats.

The importance of good nutrition for mothers during pregnancy has long been recognized, but Dr. Price’s investigation showed that primitives understood and practiced preconception nutritional programs for both parents. Many tribes required a period of premarital nutrition, and children were spaced to permit the mother to maintain her full health and strength, thus assuring subsequent offspring of physical excellence. Special foods were often given to pregnant and lactating women, as well as to the maturing boys and girls in preparation for future parenthood. Dr. Price found these foods to be very rich in fat soluble vitamins A and D nutrients found only in animal fats.

These primitives with their fine bodies, homogeneous reproduction, emotional stability and freedom from degenerative ills stand forth in sharp contrast to those subsisting on the impoverished foods of civilization-sugar, white flour, pasteurized milk and convenience foods filled with extenders and additives.

Characteristics of Traditional Diets

    1. The diets of healthy primitive and nonindustrialized peoples contain no refined or denatured foods such as refined sugar or corn syrup; white flour; canned foods; pasteurized, homogenized, skim or low-fat milk; refined or hydrogenated vegetable oils; artificial vitamins or toxic additives and colorings.
    2. All traditional cultures consume some sort of animal protein and fat from fish and other seafood; water and land fowl; land animals; eggs; milk and milk products; reptiles; and insects.
    3. Primitive diets contain at least four times the calcium and other minerals and TEN times the fat soluble vitamins from animal fats (vitamin A, vitamin D and the Price Factor–now believed to be vitamin K2) as the average American diet.
    4. In all traditional cultures, some animal products are eaten raw.
    5. Primitive and traditional diets have a high food-enzyme content from raw dairy products, raw meat and fish; raw honey; tropical fruits; cold-pressed oils; wine and unpasteurized beer; and naturally preserved, lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, beverages, meats and condiments.
    6. Seeds, grains and nuts are soaked, sprouted, fermented or naturally leavened in order to neutralize naturally occuring antinutrients in these foods, such as phytic acid, enzyme inhibitors, tannins and complex carbohydrates.

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  1. Total fat content of traditional diets varies from 30% to 80% but only about 4% of calories come from polyunsaturated oils naturally occurring in grains, pulses, nuts, fish, animal fats and vegetables. The balance of fat calories is in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.
  2. Traditional diets contain nearly equal amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids.
  3. All primitive diets contain some salt.
  4. Traditional cultures consume animal bones, usually in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths.
  5. Traditional cultures make provisions for the health of future generations by providing special nutrient-rich foods for parents-to-be, pregnant women and growing children; by proper spacing of children; and by teaching the principles of right diet to the young.

Dietary Dangers

  1. Don’t eat commercially processed foods such as cookies, cakes, crackers, TV dinners, soft drinks, packaged sauce mixes, etc.
  2. Avoid all refined sweeteners such as sugar, dextrose, glucose and high fructose corn syrup.
  3. Avoid white flour, white flour products and white rice.
  4. Avoid all hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats and oils.
  5. Avoid all vegetable oils made from soy, corn, safflower, canola or cottonseed.
  6. Do not use polyunsaturated oils for cooking, sauteing or baking.
  7. Avoid fried foods.
  8. Do not practice veganism; animal products provide vital nutrients not found in plant foods.
  9. Avoid pasteurized milk; do not consume lowfat milk, skim milk, powdered milk or imitation milk products.
  10. Avoid battery-produced eggs and factory-farmed meats.
  11. Avoid highly processed luncheon meats and sausage containing MSG and other additives.
  12. Avoid rancid and improperly prepared seeds, nuts and grains found in granolas, quick rise breads and extruded breakfast cereals, as they block mineral absorption and cause intestinal distress.
  13. Avoid canned, sprayed, waxed, bioengineered or irradiated fruits and vegetables.
  14. Avoid artificial food additives, especially MSG, hydrolyzed vegetable protein and aspartame, which are neurotoxins. Most soups, sauce and broth mixes and commercial condiments contain MSG, even if not so labeled.
  15. Avoid caffeine-containing beverages such as coffee, tea and soft drinks. Avoid chocolate.
  16. Avoid aluminum-containing foods such as commercial salt, baking powder and antacids. Do not use aluminum cookware or aluminum-containing deodorants.
  17. Do not drink fluoridated water.
  18. Avoid synthetic vitamins and foods containing them.
  19. Do not drink distilled liquors.
  20. Do not use a microwave oven

This article is written by Bill Esch

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